Home » Cookies » Oatmeal Cookies for Auntie Connie

Oatmeal Cookies for Auntie Connie

Oatmeal Cookies

Oatmeal Cookies

I was always close to my Auntie Connie since she lived in the same town as we did until I was 10.  Later when my Dad was transferred due to his job and we moved to different towns, I could visit her when I stayed with my Thompson grandparents for a couple of weeks each summer.  Both Grandma and Auntie Connie made me feel so welcome.  Being the oldest of 5 siblings, it was the only time I could be a spoiled only child.

I just plain loved soaking up the attention.  During the days I spent with Auntie Connie we sometimes satisfied our mutual love of rummage sales.  She would drive and we would look for signs and stop at the rummage sales.  I don’t remember either of us buying much.  We just had fun looking at garage sales and commenting afterwards on the strange things people sell.

Beat together butter, white sugar and brown sugar

Beat together butter, white sugar and brown sugar

When I returned to town to go to college, Auntie Connie would call every couple of weeks and ask if I wanted to “come over and visit”.  She would come and get me during the winter when my car was in storage (I wasn’t much of a winter driver).  Sometimes she’d ask me to make oatmeal cookies for them.  She claimed nobody made them like I did.  I don’t think I’ve liked any oatmeal cookies since.  Even I liked those.

Beat in egg and vanilla

Beat in egg and vanilla

Betty Crocker was already my muse back then, but I rarely cooked or baked yet.  It was by luck that I made oatmeal cookies that were flat and crispy, yet chewy at the same time.  Auntie Connie and her family loved them, so I often baked cookies at her house.   We’d talk late into the night, Connie supplying us with many cans of ice cold Fresca.  I don’t think I’ve had a can of Fresca since her passing.

Beat in flour, baking powder, baking soda and salt.  When mixed, beat in oatmeal a little at a time

Beat in flour, baking powder, baking soda and salt. When mixed, beat in oatmeal a little at a time

Does your family chat best at the kitchen table?  My whole Thompson family did that.  Still does, actually.  Whenever I visit my sisters we end up at the kitchen table where our cups of coffee or lattes can sit in front of us as we catch up on family chat.

Scoop 2 tablespoons at a time into a ball and flatten to 1/2" thick

Scoop 2 tablespoons at a time into a ball and flatten to 1/2″ thick

Both of my kids also loved their Auntie Connie when we visited.  She would get down on the floor when they were toddlers and pretend to chase them, making them giggle and shriek.  They loved visiting her and she was so tickled they remembered her name in their little babytalk ways.

Bake 14-16 minutes, untl the edges just begin to brown

Bake 14-16 minutes, untl the edges just begin to brown

I lost my Aunt Connie to cancer when she was only 47.  We’d recently moved back to town and I was looking forward to spending more time at the kitchen table, Frescas in hand, talking about the world.  It didn’t seem fair that cancer took a woman who was always so very kind to me.  She wasn’t perfect, but she made me feel important for a few days every summer when I was a kid and later as a mother.

Oatmeal Cookies

Oatmeal Cookies

I spent a lot of time visiting her that last year.  I went up to the hospital and made her laugh until she asked me nicely to not make her laugh since it hurt her to do so.  She’d had breast cancer several years earlier and when the cancer returned it was in her lungs.  It was a painful process to say goodbye.  Her birthday was yesterday and I still miss her.

Oatmeal Cookies

Oatmeal Cookies

I wish I had the cookbook or recipe for those famous oatmeal cookies.  I recently found a recipe that looked very close to the ones I made way back when.  I omitted the orange zest, you can decide for yourself since I left it in the recipe.  They were almost as good as the cookies I made for Auntie Connie.

Oatmeal Cookies for Auntie Connie

1 3/4 sticks butter; room temp
1 cup granulated sugar
1/4 cup brown sugar
Zest of one orange (optional, I omitted)
1 large egg
1 teaspoon vanilla extract
1 cup all-purpose flour
3/4 teaspoon baking powder
1/2 Teaspoon baking soda
1/2 teaspoon salt
2 1/2 cups rolled oats (Old Fashioned)

Preheat oven to 350°F

Cream butter and sugars with a hand mixer or stand mixer on medium speed until smooth and creamy.  Beat in the egg and vanilla.

In a separate bowl combine dry ingredients except the oats.  Slowly add the dry ingredients to your batter.  When they are well combined, add the oats a ½ cup at a time.  This will insure that the flour and leavening are evenly disbursed before the oats are added.

Bake on parchment  lined baking sheets, using 2 tablespoons of batter per cookie.  They will spread, you won’t want more than 8 cookies per sheet.  Press cookies down until they are about ½” thick.  Bake for 14-16 minutes, rotating pan halfway as necessary.

Cookies will be lightly browned on the edges.  Remove the pan to a rack to cool.  Do not remove cookies until they are cooled, as they will become crisp and firm as they cool.

Makes about 24 cookies (I used a large cookie scoop, heaped over into a ball.  My recipe made 26 cookies.  Close enough!

Adapted from MacheesmoTiara Logo

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